Bad Luck and Trouble

Version: Abridged
Author: Lee Child
Narrator: Dick Hill
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Horror, Political Thriller
Publisher: Random House (Audio)
Published In: May 2007
# of Units: 5 CDs
Length: 6 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

From a helicopter high above the empty California desert, a man is sent free-falling into the night…. In Chicago, a woman learns that an elite team of ex–army investigators is being hunted down one by one.... And on the streets of Portland, Jack Reacher—soldier, cop, hero—is pulled out of his wandering life by a code that few other people could understand. From the first shocking scenes in Lee Child’s explosive new novel, Jack Reacher is plunged like a knife into the heart of a conspiracy that is killing old friends…and is on its way to something even worse.

A decade postmilitary, Reacher has an ATM card and the clothes on his back—no phone, no ties, and no address. But now a woman from his old unit has done the impossible. From Chicago, Frances Neagley finds Reacher, using a signal only the eight members of their elite team of army investigators would know. She tells him a terrifying story—about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his old team, scrambling to raise the living, bury the dead, and connect the dots in a mystery that is growing darker by the day. The deeper they dig, the more they don’t know: about two other comrades who have suddenly gone missing—and a trail that leads into the neon of Vegas and the darkness of international terrorism.

For now, Reacher can only react. To every sound. Every suspicion. Every scent and every moment. Then Reacher will trust the people he once trusted with his life—and take this thing all the way to the end. Because in a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they’d better be ready for what comes right back at them…

Reviews (18)

Written by Brian H. on March 9th, 2019

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I gave this four stars because it brings back his old MP crew. As a whole it was a good book, only a few times do you feel the writer was over describing the scene. In the end I thought the “bad guys” were not the brightest and was disappointed that they were able to do what they did against some of Reacher’s elite team. I read/listen in chronological order and the series has been getting better since “The Punisher”. His active duty days are the best. After I finished this book I wanted to get the next in the series, which is how I rate how good the story was.

0

Written by Carmen W. on February 13th, 2019

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I love the Jack Reacher Novels. I especially love Dick Hill as the reader. I am not a fan when it is another reader. I find it hard to listen when it is not Dick Hill reading.

0

Written by John B on April 6th, 2018

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Great book, great story. The pace of the book was perfect and Dick Hill does such a great job narrating, much better than others.

Written by Craig Temczuk on August 28th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Good book. I love the Jack Reacher novels. This one is as good as the rest. I recommend this book.

Written by Andrew Soliz on August 3rd, 2014

  • Book Rating: 5/5

great story, love that they brought the whole team into the story.I hope there is another story where they come together.

Bad Luck & Trouble

Written by Anonymous on October 15th, 2012

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Absolutely loved it. Love Jack Reacher and how he works things out. Can't get enough.

Different than most

Written by The Rev from Whitsett, NC on December 28th, 2009

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Unlike almost every other reviewer I thought the narration was GREAT. The guy BECAME Jack Reacher for me. Wonderfully entertaining story, great characters, good plot twists and a good guy with a REAL mean streak. My first, but certainly not last Lee Childs. Good read.

Average

Written by Anonymous on August 3rd, 2009

  • Book Rating: 3/5

This was my first Lee Child novel. It was average. At times, the book didn't have my full attention.

Decent

Written by Anonymous on September 30th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I really liked this book. It was my first from this author and I have to say, I'm glad I took the chance. I was totally drawn into the story right from the start. It was hard not to want to see what came next which seemed to happen over and over again. Never got real slow or to detailed - yet built on the, very interesting characters, in a methodical manner and just the right amount of detail. Real good listen if you are a fan of the genre and even if you are not. Well written all the way around. My only criticism was the quality of the sound. At first it seemed like it was the narrator, but as time went on it became more obvious that it was the quality of the recording. The narrator did taper of his volume a bit, bit and put emphasis in areas that did not always seem appropriate, but I think it was the quality that bothered me. I kind of liked the narrators style - it grew on me. All in all.....good book and I highly recommend.

Not bad

Written by Rob on September 30th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This was my first Lee Child book. Not bad novel to listen to.

Author Details

Author Details

Child, Lee

Lee Child was born in the exact geographic center of England, in the heart of the industrial badlands. Never saw a tree until he was twelve. It was the sort of place where if you fell in the river, you had to go to the hospital for a mandatory stomach pump. The sort of place where minor disputes were settled with box cutters and bicycle chains. He's got the scars to prove it.

But he survived, got an education, and went to law school, but only because he didn't want to be a lawyer. Without the pressure of aiming for a job in the field, he figured it would be a relaxing subject to study. He spent most of the time in the university theater - to the extent that he had to repeat several courses, because he failed the exams - and then went to work for Granada Television in Manchester, England. Back then, Granada was a world-famous production company, known for shows like Brideshead Revisited, Jewel in the Crown, Prime Suspect and Cracker. Lee worked on the broadcast side of the company, so his involvement with the good stuff was limited. But he remembers waiting in the canteen line with people like Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud, Natalie Wood and Michael Apted. And he says that being involved with more than 40,000 hours of the company's program output over an eighteen-year stay taught him a thing or two about telling a story. He also wrote thousands of links, trailers, commercials and news stories, most of them on deadlines that ranged from fifteen minutes to fifteen seconds. So the thought of a novel-a-year didn't worry him too much, in his next career.

But why a next career? He was fired, back in 1995, that's why. It was the usual Nineties downsizing thing. After eighteen years, he was an expensive veteran, and he was also the union organizer, and neither thing fit the company's plan for the future. And because of the union involvement, he wasn't on too many alternative employers' wish lists, either. So he became a writer, because he couldn't think of anything else to do. He had an idea for a character who had suffered the same downsizing experience but who was taking it completely in his stride. And he figured if he brought the same total commitment to his audience that he'd seen his television peers develop, he could get something going. He named the character Jack Reacher and wrote Killing Floor as fast as he could. He needed to sell it before his severance check ran out. He made it with seven weeks to spare, and luckily the book was an instant hit, selling strongly all around the world, and winning both the Anthony Award and the Barry Award for Best First Novel. It led to contracts for at least nine more Reacher books.

Lee moved from the UK to the US in the summer of 1998. He lives in New York and France with his American wife, Jane. They have a grown-up daughter, Ruth. Lee likes to travel, for vacations, but especially on promotion tours so he can meet his readers, to whom he is eternally grateful. His latest thriller, Nothing to Lose was published in 2008.