Moby Dick

Version: Unabridged (Abridged version available here)
Author: Herman Melville
Narrator: Adams Morgan
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Literature
Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks
Published In: November 2000
# of Units: 20 CDs
Length: 20 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title—offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of Moby Dick includes a Foreword, Biographical Note, and Afterword by R.L. Fisher.

When a wandering sailor looking to be hired onto a whaling ship finds himself on the Pequod, little does he know the dire fate that awaits him and his crewmates. For the ship's captain, Ahab, is slowly going insane. Having lost a leg in an ill-fated harpoon attack against a fearsome white whale many years before, Ahab vows his revenge against Moby Dick--a vow that has become Ahab's deadly obsession.

After many months at sea, Moby Dick is spotted, and Ahab engages the crew in relentless pursuit. Ahab will stop at nothing to kill the beast...even if it means his own death--and the death of all his crew.

Can Ahab be stopped before it is too late? Or will the Pequod--and all its crew--perish in the silent depths of the sea...?

Reviews (10)

THE worst narrator

Written by Anonymous from Waterford, VA on September 14th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 2/5

There were glimmers of this book's greatness that rose to the surface even though the narrator was the worst I've listened to. His attempt to change voices for each of the characters was not only distracting, it made the novel torturous. I would NOT recommend this reading of the classic.

SUCKS

Written by Derek Dean on November 20th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 1/5

There are times when a book deserves all it's accolades. A time when people who follow books read them and cherish them forever. This book, I got based on the fact that I could some day say I know the whole story to this 24 hour long dismal boring tale. It's chapters worth of sentences that could be broken down into a paragraph. This book is literally a basic not great by any means story, filled with fluff. Lots and lots of fluff.

Moby Dick

Written by Anonymous from Kansas City, MO on April 7th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I was apprehensive about getting this audiobook because I was afraid the prose would be too stilted and the book would be dry and dull to listen to. I found it to be quite the opposite. This book is about as politically incorrect as it could be, which isn't surprising, since it was written in the 1850s. The main character's prejudices are tolerable, becase he still interacts favorably with the objects of his prejudice. For example, he becomes close friends with "a savage canibal" and writes about the "savage" with admiration. In the middle of the book, however, detailed descriptions of whale hunting begin. I don't consider myself the most sensitive person regarding conservation, but the blow by blow description of killing whales was hard to listen to and when they kill a new born whale, who's umbilical cord is still attached, it was just too much for this reader and I sent the book back without continuing.

Moby Dick

Written by Molly Rhea from Heppner, OR on October 7th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I listened to this book because I had always heard reference to it and had not read it. Very long and sometimes difficult to follow. Interesting, but not one I will listen to again.

Moby Dick

Written by Erik K from la, CA on March 14th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 1/5

I never read any of my highschool reading assignments, and now at 34, Im tearing through these classic audiobooks, and feeding my head, and loving it. EXCEPT the 16 hours Ive spent with Ishmael.. This book was so exhaustively descriptive over everything, that "Moby Dick" does not get mentioned until chapter 40! I kept listening and telling myself.. You can do this Erik.. This is a classic. This is "Moby Dick". Something great in literature will happen any page/chapter/disc now.. But it really never does. Im sorry to say that, but you are just stranded with this narrator that just rambles on about whales, and water, and rope, and Im guessing to say the 'Marina Phonebook" may prove to be shorter and more entertaining. After I finished this book, I felt really duped that no one warned me about this before.. The next book I had, "Call of the Wild" was fantastic. It is an exhilarating white water rapid ride as compared to watching paint dry. Try that instead.

Moby Dick

Written by Elliott Tepperman on January 10th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 1/5

Unfortunate this was quite possibly the most boring book I have ever listened to. While Melville is a good writer in terms of language and structure, his story telling style does not stand the test of time. Though easy to understand for a book written of this era, he drones on about seemingly unimportant things. For example, he talks about the color white for upwards of 50 minutes, to make a point that was understood in the first two minutes. I do not recommend this book to others. If like I was, you feel compelled to listen to this book, do yourself a favour and go for the abridged.

Moby Dick

Written by Anonymous on September 29th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I have always wanted to read this book for some time. But since listening to it I find it to be very slow and dry. I am glad I have gotten this book out of my system, however, I am glad I listen to this book.

1800's Whaling 101

Written by Howeln from Alpine, CA on July 27th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Ok, classic...yes. Good, yes. Great imagery, yes. If you are reading this for the first time, like I was, the book is about whaling in the 1800's. Out of the 134 chapters, the story line about Ahab and Moby Dick take up only a couple chapters in the first 115 Chapters. And about 75% of the last 20 chapters. If I had known it was primarily about Whaling, I think I would have enjoyed it more from the start. I kept expecting more on the plot line. Again, this is a good book, but plan on finding out every detail about Whaling in the 1800's. And I mean EVERY detail. Such as how to get oil from Whales, how much oil you can get, how much oil and material from a whale corpes, how to hunt the whale, the different types of whales (as known in the 1800's), how they store the oil, how they create the fire to boil the blubber without wood, how the teams work in hunting whale, how ships interact on the water, etc, etc, etc,. I think you get the idea. :-)

Enjoyable Classic

Written by Ryan Abel from Mountain Center, CA on June 1st, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the history and specifics of early American whaling. Melville does an excellent job at developing the plot between Ahab and Moby Dick; I could really feel the tension and hatred building. I also enjoyed the language used, I felt like my vocabulary expanded while listening to this author.

Moby Dick

Written by Anonymous on March 9th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 2/5

You have to be patient when reading this book. At times the author carries on about things that are not really relevent to the story. However, the parts the do pertain to the story are interesting. Also, despite the laguage it is written in it is pretty easy to understand.

Author Details

Author Details

Melville, Herman

"Herman Melville was born in New York City into an established merchant family. His father became bankrupt and insane, dying when Melville was 12. A bout of scarlet fever in 1826 left Melville with permanently weakened eyesight. He attended Albany (N.Y.) Classical School in 1835. He left the school and was largely autodidact, devouring Shakespeare as well as historical, anthropological, and technical works. From the age of 12, he worked as a clerk, teacher, and farmhand. In search of adventures, he shipped out in 1839 as a cabin boy on the whaler ""Achushnet"". He later joined the US Navy, and started his year long voyages on ships. During these years he was a clerk and bookkeeper in a general store in Honolulu and lived briefly among the Typee cannibals in the Marquesas Islands. Another ship rescued him and took him to Tahiti.

Typee was first published in Britain, like most of his works. Its sequel, Omoo (1847), was based on his experiences in Polynesian Islands and like its predecessor it gained a huge success. Throughout his career Melville enjoyed a rather higher estimation in Britain than in America. His older brother Gansevoort held a government position in London, and helped to launch Melville's career. From his third book, Mardi and a Voyage Thither (1849), Melville started to experience the unpredictable turns of popular acclaim.

In 1847 Melville married Elisabeth Shaw, daughter of the chief justice of Massachusetts. After three yeas in New York, he bought a farm, ""Arrowhead"", near Nathaniel Hawthorne's home at Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and became friends with him for some time. Melville had almost completed Moby-Dick when Hawthorne encouraged him to change it from a story full of details about whaling, into an allegorical novel.

Inspired by the achievement of Hawthore, Melville wrote his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. When the novel was published, it did not bring him the fame he had acquired in the 1840s. Its brilliance was noted by some critics and very few readers. The narrator is Ishmael, who signs aboard the whaler Pequod with his friend Queequeg, a harpooner from the South Sea Islands. The mood of the story changes soon from the conventions of 19th-century comic realism. The reader is confronted by a plurality of linguistic discourses, philosophical speculations, and Shakespearean rhetoric and dramatic staging. Mysterious Captain Ahab appears after several days at sea. He reveals to the crew that the purpose of the voyage is to hunt and kill the white sperm whale, known as Mody-Dick, that had cost Ahab his leg on a previous voyage. The novel culminates when Moby-Dick charges the boat which sinks. Ahab is drowned, tied by the harpoon line his archenemy. The only survivor is Ishmael. Moby-Dick was misunderstood by those who read and reviewed it. Through Ishmael the author meditated questions about faith and the workings of God's intelligence. He returned to these meditations in his last great work, Billy Budd, a story left unfinished at his death.

Pierre (1852), a Gothic romance and psychological study based on the author's childhood, was a financial and critical disaster. Melville's stories in Putnam's Monthly Magazine reflected the despair and the contempt for human hypocrisy and materialism. Among the stories were 'The Scrivener' (1853), 'The Encantadas' (1854) and 'Benito Cereno' (1855).

The Confidence Man (1857), Melville's last novel, was a harsh satire of American life set on a Mississippi River steamboat. After 1857 he wrote only poetry. To recover from a breakdown, he undertook a long journey to Europe and the Holy Land. Clarel (1876), a long poem about religious crisis, was based on this trip, and reflected his Manichean view of God. Subsequent works were privately printed and distributed among a very small circle of acquintances.

After unsuccessfull lecture tours in 1857-60, Melville lived in Washington, D.C. (1861-62). He moved to New York, where he was appointed customs inspector on the New York docks. This work secured him a regular income. Melville's later works include Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War (1865), privately printed John Marr and the Other Sailors (1888), and Timoleon (1891). Melville's death on September 28, 1891, in New York, was noted with only one obituary notice. His unfinished work, Billy Budd, Foretopman, remained unpublished until 1924."