T Is for Trespass

Version: Unabridged
Author: Sue Grafton
Narrator: Judy Kaye
Genres: Detective Stories
Publisher: Random House Audio Assets
Published In: December 2007
# of Units: 10 CDs
Length: 13 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

tres•pass 'tres-p  s n: a transgression of law involving one’s obligations to God or to one’s neighbor; a violation of moral law; an offense; a sin –Webster’s New International Dictionary (second edition, unabridged)

In what may be her most unsettling novel to date, Sue Grafton’s T is for Trespass is also her most direct confrontation with the forces of evil. Beginning slowly with the day-to-day life of a private eye, Grafton suddenly shifts from the perspective of Kinsey Millhone to that of Solana Rojas, introducing listeners to a chilling sociopath. Rojas is not her birth name. It is an identity she cunningly stole, an identity that gives her access to private care-giving  jobs. The true horror of this novel builds with excruciating tension as the listener foresees the awfulness that lies ahead. The wrenching suspense lies in whether Kinsey Millhone will realize what is happening in time to intervene.

T is for Trespass–dealing with issues of identity theft, elder abuse, betrayal of trust, and the breakdown in the institutions charged with caring for the weak and the dependent–targets an all-too-real rip in the social fabric. Grafton takes us into far darker territory than she has ever traversed, leaving us with a true sense of the horror embedded in the seeming ordinariness of the world we think we know. The result is terrifying.

Reviews (3)

0

Written by Amy F. on June 6th, 2018

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Loved it!

Written by Rhonda Gill on July 15th, 2014

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Long Time Fan- Audiobooks is so easy to use and the audio is great thank you so much for letting me get caught up on my favorite mystery writer! The story was white knuckles and thrilling I loved how everything intertwined and I thought that this particular story really lent itself to the reality of Kinsey's world.

Trespass

Written by Barbara L on January 14th, 2009

  • Book Rating: 2/5

I usually enjoy these books, but this one was most painful and I was so thrilled it was over that I put it into the mailbox without even checking that the final disc had been included. Which, of course, it wasn't. Kinsey Millhone has lost her intelligence, logic, and quick thinking skills. Ms. Grafton deserves a much better editor. Unless you just HAVE to listen to all books in this series, I would suggest you skip this one.

Author Details

Author Details

Grafton, Sue

Sue Grafton is published in 28 countries and 26 languages—including Estonian, Bulgarian, and Indonesian. She’s an international bestseller with a readership in the millions. She’s a writer who believes in the form that she has chosen to mine: "The mystery novel offers a world in which justice is served. Maybe not in a court of law," she has said, "but people do get their just desserts." And like Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald, Robert Parker and the John D. MacDonald—the best of her breed—she has earned new respect for that form. Her readers appreciate her buoyant style, her eye for detail, her deft hand with character, her acute social observances, and her abundant storytelling talents.

But who is the real Sue Grafton? Many of her readers think she is simply a version of her character and alter ego Kinsey Millhone. Here are Kinsey’s own words in the early pages of N Is for Noose:

"So there I was barreling down the highway in search of employment and not at all fussy about what kind of work I’d take. I wanted distraction. I wanted some money, escape, anything to keep my mind off the subject of Robert Deitz. I’m not good at good-byes. I’ve suffered way too many in my day and I don’t like the sensation. On the other hand, I’m not that good at relationships. Get close to someone and the next thing you know, you’ve given them the power to wound, betray, irritate, abandon you, or bore you senseless. My general policy is to keep my distance, thus avoiding a lot of unruly emotion. In psychiatric circles, there are names for people like me."

Those are sentiments that hit home for Grafton’s readers. And she has said that Kinsey is herself, only younger, smarter, and thinner. But are they an apt description of Kinsey’s creator? Well, she’s been married to Steve Humphrey for more than twenty years. She has three kids and two grandkids. She loves cats, gardens, and good cuisine—not quite the nature-hating, fast-food loving Millhone. So: readers and reviewers beware. Never assume the author is the character in the book. Sue, who has a home in Montecito, California ("Santa Theresa") and another in Louisville, the city in which she was born and raised, is only in her imagination Kinsey Millhone—but what a splendid imagination it is.