Holes

Version: Unabridged
Author: Louis Sachar
Narrator: Kerry Beyer
Genres: Juvenile & Children's
Publisher: Listening Library
Published In: February 2001
# of Units: 4 CDs
Length: 4 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

"If you take a bad boy and make him dig a hole every day in the hot sun, it will turn him into a good boy." Such is the reigning philosophy at Camp Green Lake, a juvenile detention facility where there is no lake, and there are no happy campers. In place of what used to be "the largest lake in Texas" is now a dry, flat, sunburned wasteland, pocked with countless identical holes dug by boys improving their character. Stanley Yelnats, of palindromic name and ill-fated pedigree, has landed at Camp Green Lake because it seemed a better option than jail. No matter that his conviction was all a case of mistaken identity, the Yelnats family has become accustomed to a long history of bad luck, thanks to their "no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather!" Despite his innocence, Stanley is quickly enmeshed in the Camp Green Lake routine: rising before dawn to dig a hole five feet deep and five feet in diameter; learning how to get along with the Lord of the Flies-styled pack of boys in Group D; and fearing the warden, who paints her fingernails with rattlesnake venom. But when Stanley realizes that the boys may not just be digging to build character--that in fact the warden is seeking something specific--the plot gets as thick as the irony.
It's a strange story, but strangely compelling and lovely too. Louis Sachar uses poker-faced understatement to create a bizarre but believable landscape--a place where Major Major Major Major of Catch-22 would feel right at home. But while there is humor and absurdity here, there is also a deep understanding of friendship and a searing compassion for society's underdogs. As Stanley unknowingly begins to fulfill his destiny--the dual plots coming together to reveal that fate has big plans in store--we can't help but cheer for the good guys, and all the Yelnats everywhere.

Reviews (10)

Written by Anonymous on July 20th, 2018

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I think that this book is a great book to read. I would recommend this book to teenagers and adults of all ages.

Holes

Written by ilyas jibriil on December 30th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I would recommend this audiobook because of its lessons for teenagers who don\'t want to come from the holes they had been in before. Thanks for this audioboo.

Written by Erica Vetter on December 10th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Voices were believable, the story is great, and it moves a good pace for the classroom or car ride. Listeners of all ages would enjoy, but perfect for my fifth grade class.

Written by Steven Engelking on September 27th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Good book But it is a very fast book for a 11 year old that takes it to school

Written by LaJonda Searcy on July 1st, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I did not think that I would enjoy this book as much as I have! The narrator's voice merely painted a picture with his melodic voice. Sacher did a wonderful job writing this novel. Thank you!!!!

Holes

Written by Elizabeth Kennedy on June 8th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

A great book

Written by mona khamissi on March 21st, 2016

  • Book Rating: 4/5

thanks it's the clear, best audio but it's a little bit fast. but understandable.

Written by Kym Dozier on June 28th, 2015

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This is a good book and very fun to listen to this is a good starter book for this app

Written by Kristen McLaughlin on June 26th, 2015

  • Book Rating: 4/5

When I read Holes, I really enjoyed it. It was easy to listen to and easy to follow along in a book.

Fun Story

Written by Anonymous from Scappoose, OR on January 7th, 2008

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This was a fun and easy to hear story for both adults and tweens.

Author Details

Author Details

Sachar, Louis

When Louis Sachar was going to school, his teachers always pronounced his name wrong. Now that he has become a popular author of children's books, teachers all over the country are pronouncing his name wrong. It should be pronounced "Sacker," like someone who tackles quarterbacks or someone who stuffs potatoes into sacks.

Mr. Sachar received a B.A. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. His first book, "Sideways Stories from Wayside School, " was accepted for publication during his first year of law school. After receiving his law degree, he spent six years asking himse