The Confessor

Version: Abridged
Author: Daniel Silva
Narrator: Arliss Howard
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Thriller
Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
Published In: November 2005
# of Units: 5 CDs
Length: 6 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

From the author who “ranks among the best of the younger American spy novelists” (The Washington Post) comes a stunning thriller of ancient and modern betrayal.

Munich: The writer Benjamin Stern entered his flat to see a man standing there, leafing through his research, and said, “Who the hell are you?” In answer, the man shot him. As Stern lay dying, the gunman murmured a few words in Latin, then gathered the writer’s papers and left.

Venice: The art restorer Gabriel Allon applied a dab of paint carefully to the Bellini, then saw the boy approaching, a piece of paper in his hand. It would be about Stern, he knew. They would want him to leave right away. With a sigh, the Mossad agent finished his work, then began to pack his brushes.

Vatican City: The pope known as Paul VII—“Pope Accidental,” to his detractors—paced in his garden, thinking about the things he knew and the enemies he would make. He believed he understood why God had chosen him for this job, but the road in front of him was hard and exceedingly perilous. If he succeeded, he would revolutionize the Church. If not, he might very well destroy it—and himself.

In the weeks to come, the journeys of all these men will come together, following a trail of long-buried secrets and unthinkable deeds, leaving each one forever changed. Intrigue will dominate their lives and death stalk their paths, all of them in the shadow of the Confessor.

Filled with rich characters, remarkable prose, and an intricately woven plot suffused with surprise and intensity, this is an uncommonly powerful work by a new master of the art.

Reviews (9)

Written by Dina J on May 1st, 2018

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Again, Gabriel, I love the character. Always glad he gets his guy in the end. I would have liked it more if we would have heard HOW he came to find him in the end.

Captivating

Written by ColoradoSunDevil on June 5th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Excellent, one of his best. Exciting from beginning to the end.

The Confessor

Written by Anonymous on April 9th, 2012

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I found the book totally engaging. I'm relatively new to Daniel Silva books, but have found all of them captivating.

The Confessor

Written by Anonymous on March 9th, 2012

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Typical Daniel Silva story of Gabiel Allon....described by some as Isreal's Jack Bauer. My favorite series. Too bad it is abridged.

the confessor

Written by big joe on May 2nd, 2007

  • Book Rating: 3/5

good story line lots of evil doings but narrator a bit boring

Abridged but still good

Written by Dan Pressley on April 13th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

I generally don't care much for abridged versions of books. I want the whole story. This book managed to keep pace without losing critical depth to the storyline. The story kept my interest throughout.

Good Book

Written by Michael on December 6th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I have liked all of Daniel Silva's books. This was not the best one but I did enjoy it.

Confessor

Written by Bonnie on March 20th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Very good listen. Good plot & moved fast. The only fault I find is that the narrator is not very animated. He almost sounds bored.

the confessor

Written by Lee Werley on December 20th, 2004

  • Book Rating: 3/5

I thought this was good. It moved fairly fast with a lot of Italian names. Good overall story

Author Details

Author Details

Silva, Daniel

He has been placed in the same category as John le Carré and Graham Greene. He has been called his generation’s finest writer of international intrigue and one of the greatest American spy novelists ever. Compelling, passionate, haunting, brilliant: these are the words that have been used to describe the work of Daniel Silva.

Silva burst onto the scene in 1997 with his electrifying bestselling debut, The Unlikely Spy, a novel of love and deception set around the Allied invasion of France in World War II. His second and third novels, The Mark of the Assassin and The Marching Season, were also instant New York Times bestsellers and starred two of Silva’s most memorable characters: CIA officer Michael Osbourne and international hit man Jean-Paul Delaroche. But it was Silva’s fourth novel, The Kill Artist, that would alter the course of his career. The novel featured a character described as one of the most memorable and compelling in contemporary fiction, the art restorer and sometime Israeli secret agent Gabriel Allon, and though Silva did not realize it at the time, Gabriel’s adventures had only just begun. Gabriel Allon appeared in Silva’s next four novels, each one more successful than the last: The English Assassin, The Confessor, A Death in Vienna, and Prince of Fire. The sixth Gabriel Allon novel, The Messenger, will be published in July 2006.

Silva knew from a very early age that he wanted to become a writer, but his first profession would be journalism. Born in Michigan, raised and educated in California, he was pursuing a master’s degree in international relations when he received a temporary job offer from United Press International to help cover the 1984 Democratic National Convention in San Francisco. Later that year Silva abandoned his studies and joined UPI fulltime, working first in San Francisco, then on the foreign desk in Washington, and finally as Middle East correspondent in Cairo and the Persian Gulf. In 1987, while covering the Iran-Iraq war, he met NBC correspondent Jamie Gangel. They were married later that year. Silva returned to Washington and went to work for CNN. In 1994 Jamie gave birth to a set of twins, Lily and Nicholas.

In 1995 he confessed to Jamie that his true ambition was to be a novelist. With her support and encouragement he secretly began work on the manuscript that would eventually become The Unlikely Spy. He left CNN in 1997 after the book’s successful publication and began writing full time. He continues to reside in Washington and when not writing he can usually be found roaming the stacks of the Georgetown University library, where he does much of the research for his books.

Though all of Silva’s books have been New York Times and national bestsellers, his success has not been limited to the United States. His books have been translated into more than 25 languages and have been published across Europe and around the world. He is currently at work on a new Gabriel Allon novel and warmly thanks all those friends and loyal readers who have helped to make the series a success.