The Day I Ate Whatever I Wanted: And Other Small Acts of Liberation

Version: Unabridged
Author: Elizabeth Berg
Narrator: Elizabeth Berg
Genres: Fiction & Literature
Publisher: Random House Audio Assets
Published In: April 2008
# of Units: 7 CDs
Length: 8 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Exhilarating short stories of women breaking free from convention

Every now and then, right in the middle of an ordinary day, a woman rebels, kicks up her heels, and commits a small act of liberation.

What would you do, if you were going to break out and away? Go AWOL from Weight Watchers and spend an entire day eating every single thing you want–and then some? Start a dating service for people over fifty to reclaim the razzle-dazzle in your life–or your marriage? Seek comfort in the face of aging, look for love in the midst of loss, find friendship in the most surprising of places?

Imagine that the people in these wonderful stories–who do all of these things and more–are asking you: What would you do, if nobody was looking?

Reviews (1)

great book, so uplifting

Written by Angie Teal on September 4th, 2019

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I loved the stories in this book. They were all about women of a certain age and how they managed the choppy waters of getting older. My favorite story was the last one \'Sin City\', but I would say I liked most of the stories. So full of wisdom and wit. I bought the book as a real book to send to my best friend and hope to discuss the stories with her.

Author Details

Author Details

Berg, Elizabeth

"I was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on December 2, 1948, in a hospital that has been torn down, which I’m pretty steamed about. When I was three years old, my father reenlisted in the Army, and I spent my growing up years moving around a lot—twice, I went to three schools in a single academic year. You can understand my dilemma when people ask me where I’m from. My usual answer is “Um…..nowhere?”

I’ve loved books and reading from the time my mother began reading to me, and I’ve loved writing ever since I could hold a pencil. I submitted my first poem to American Girl magazine when I was nine years old. It was rejected, and it took twenty-five years before I submitted anything again. Then, I entered a contest in a magazine and won. I wrote for magazines for ten years, then moved into novels and haven’t stopped yet. I usually do a book a year. But I have to tell you, the prospect of retiring is beginning to sound better and better. I really want to live on a hobby farm with lots of animals, including a chicken, I’m dying for a chicken.

Before I became a writer, I was a registered nurse for ten years, and that was my “school” for writing—taking care of patients taught me a lot about human nature, about hope and fear and love and loss and regret and triumph and especially about relationships--all things that I tend to focus on in my work. I worked as a waitress, which is also good training for a writer, and I sang in a rock band which was not good for anything except the money I made. I was a dramatic and dreamy child, given to living more inside my head than outside, something that persists up to today and makes me a terrible dining partner. I was married for over twenty years and am now divorced. I have two daughters and two grandchildren. I live with my partner Bill and my dog Homer outside of Chicago and in Wisconsin."