The Wailing Wind

Version: Unabridged
Author: Tony Hillerman
Narrator: Tony Hillerman , George Guidall
Genres: Detective Stories
Publisher: HarperAudio
Published In: May 2002
# of Units: 6 CDs
Length: 6 hours
Ratings:
Tell Your Friends:

Overview

Nothing had seemed complicated about that earlier one. A con game had gone sour. A swindler had tried to sell wealthy old Wiley Denton the location of one of the West's multitude of legendary lost gold mines. Denton had shot the swindler, called the police, confessed the homicide, and done his short prison time. No mystery there. Except why did the rich man's bride vanish? The cynics said she was part of the swindle plot. She'd fled when it failed. But, alas, old Joe Leaphorn was a romantic. He believed in love, and thus the Golden Calf case still troubled him. Now, papers found in this new homicide case connect the victim to Denton and to the mythical Golden Calf Mine. The first Golden Calf victim had been there just hours before Denton killed him. And while Denton was killing him, four children trespassing among the rows of empty bunkers in the long-abandoned Wingate Ordnance Depot called in an odd report to the police. They had heard, in the wind wailing around the old buildings, what sounded like music and the cries of a woman.

The questions raised by this second Golden Calf murder draw Joe Leaphorn out of retirement and aren't answered until Leaphorn discovers what the young trespassers heard in the wailing wind

Reviews (12)

The Wailing Wind

Written by Pam on March 12th, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

This is definitely one of the best of Tony Hillerman's stories of Native Americans. Interesting and I enjoy all the characters. Really good story.

The Wailing Wind

Written by SD - Betty from Hamill, SD on January 21st, 2010

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I have been a fan of Tony Hillerman for close to 20 years. I have all of his books and now I am enjoying them again through audiobooks. It was a very sad day when we lost Mr. Hillerman but the enjoyment of his books will live on forever. Never a dull or slow book.

Why I Read Hillerman

Written by Anonymous on October 17th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I love the character of Joe Leaphorn. Even though he's retired from the tribal police now, he's still solving crimes.

The Wailing Wing

Written by alessed on October 6th, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

This is another wonderful Hillerman book. A great story that is exquisitely enhanced by one of Audiobooks finest narrators.

The Wailing Wind

Written by Melissa Forbes on July 22nd, 2006

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Personally, I love all Tony Hillerman Navajo mysteries. They're clean, fun, and they move along. Also, they're not too complicated. Some mysteries introduce so many side stories that you need a scoreboard to keep track. I find the ethnic information very interesting. I would recommend these to any age group, especially young people. They can discover entertainment that doesn't involve dismemberment, gore or undying evil.

Wailing Wind

Written by Anonymous on March 5th, 2006

  • Book Rating: 4/5

An excellent book. The narration is the best, you almost feel as if you know the characters. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good mystery

Wailing Wind

Written by Deborah Martinson on May 18th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Tony Hillerman is always a pleasure to read. It took me awhile to get atuned to the reader as I had pictured something different. But it is a thoughtful and interesting, calm, book. A good, relaxing read.

A mystery definitely worth reading or listening to

Written by Scott Sherman from Los Angeles, CA on March 25th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

What an enjoyable book! I was sad when it was over. It was a good mystery, and the Navajo culture was an added bonus. The reading was excellent, making the story even better.

Wailing Wind

Written by Tonik12 on February 28th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Even better than the average Hillerman book. Leaphorn is back on the job which adds depth to the story. The contrasting relationships between Leaphorn and a white woman and Chee with a Navajo woman further helps the reader get a glimpse of Navajo culture.

Wailing Wind

Written by Anonymous on January 27th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 5/5

I have read most of Tony Hillerman's "Leghorn and Chee" novels and am just as pleased with the audio. Even though I have read the story, I was so very pleased to also listen and gain more. I suggest reading and listening! I am amazed at just how much more one gets from the book by doing both.

Author Details

Author Details

Hillerman, Tony

"Tony Hillerman was born in Sacred Heart, OK on May 27, 1925. He was the youngest of three children, having an older brother and sister. His father, August A. Hillerman, was a storekeeper and farmer. His mother was Lucy Grove Hillerman.

He attended school from 1930-38 at St. Mary's Academy, a boarding school for Native American girls at Sacred Heart. He was one of several farm boys enrolled there. Sacred Heart was near a Benedictine mission to the Citizen Band Potowatomie Tribe. For high school, he was bused to Konawa High School. He graduated in 1942. He returned to farming after a brief sojourn to college and after his father's death.

In 1943, he joined the U. S. Army, serving in combat in World War II. He was awarded the Silver Star, the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the Purple Heart after being wounded in 1945. (These injuries included broken legs, foot, ankle, facial burns, and temporary blindness.) He was discharged in 1945.

After the war, he attended the University of Oklahoma, receiving a B. A. in 1948.

He married Marie Unzner in 1948, to whom he is still married. They have six grown children.

From 1948-1962, he worked in a variety of journalist positions. He was a reporter for the Borger News Herald in Borger, TX (1948), city editor for the Morning Press-Constitution in Lawton, OK (1948-50), political reporter for UPI in Oklahoma City (1950-52), UPI bureau manager in Santa Fe, NM (1952-4), political reporter and then, editor for the Santa Fe New Mexican (1954-63).

In 1963, he returned to graduate school in English at the University of New Mexico. He was an assistant to the University president at the same time. He joined the journalism faculty of UNM in 1966 after receiving his M.A. He taught there until 1987, serving as department chair from 1976-81.

Although he says he feels great for the shape he's in, his health has been a concern. He told PBS in 1996, "" I am 71, have now-and-then rhematic arthritis but now very badly, have in-remission cancer, have had a minor heart attack, have one mediocre eye, one tricky ankle and two unreliable knees due to being blown up in WWII. ""

His memoirs were published in October, 2001. It won the Agatha Award for Best Non-Fiction.

He resides in Albuquerque, NM."