Utopia

Version: Abridged
Author: Lincoln Child
Narrator: Eric Stoltz
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Mystery, Thriller & Horror
Publisher: Random House (Audio)
Published In: December 2002
# of Units: 5 CDs
Length: 6 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

Fasten your seat belts–the white-knuckle thrills at Utopia, the world’s most fantastic theme park, escalate to nightmare proportions in this intricately imagined techno-thriller by New York Times bestselling author Lincoln Child.

Rising out of the stony canyons of Nevada, Utopia is a world on the cutting edge of technology. A theme park attracting 65,000 visitors each day, its dazzling array of robots and futuristic holograms make it a worldwide sensation. But ominous mishaps are beginning to disrupt the once flawless technology. A friendly robot goes haywire, causing panic, and a popular roller coaster malfunctions, nearly killing a teenaged rider. Dr. Andrew Warne, the brilliant computer engineer who designed much of the park’s robotics, is summoned from the East Coast to get things back on track.

On the day Warne arrives, however, Utopia is caught in the grip of something far more sinister. A group of ruthless criminals has infiltrated the park’s computerized infrastructure, giving them complete access to all of Utopia’s attractions and systems. Their communication begins with a simple and dire warning: If their demands are met, none of the 65,000 people in the park that day will ever know they were there; if not, chaos will descend, and every man, woman, and child will become a target. As one of the brains behind Utopia, Warne finds himself thrust into a role he never imagined–trying to save the lives of thousands of innocent people. And as the minutes tick away, Warne’s struggle to outsmart his opponents grows ever more urgent, for his only daughter is among the unsuspecting crowds in the park.

Lincoln Child evokes the technological wonders of Utopia with such skill and precision it is hard to believe the park exists only in the pages of this extraordinary book. Like Jurassic Park, Utopia sweeps readers into a make-believe world of riveting suspense, technology, and adventure.

UTOPIA -- Where technology dazzles–and then turns deadly!

Reviews (6)

Utopia

Written by Anonymous from Anaheim, CA on September 23rd, 2010

  • Book Rating: 2/5

Boring. Put me to sleep and I normally love this Author.

great listening

Written by 45 minute commute on July 22nd, 2007

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Hard to believe that only one person was reading this story. The story is pretty good too - just a bit quick. A few times, logic would have directed a different direction, but overall, it is believable.

UTOPIA

Written by Lee Werley from Chapel Hill, NC on August 2nd, 2006

  • Book Rating: 4/5

Nice ride through the park. Good story. The book is a great place to visit with your imagination. Credable job. Enjoyed it.

Utopia

Written by Michael on January 3rd, 2006

  • Book Rating: 2/5

The book was a little slow at times, but I did enjoy it. The plot was somewhat unique. I have read many books by Lincoln Child and Doglas Preston, this was the first one I'd read of Child without his usual co-author. It's just not the same.

Utopia

Written by Jeffrey Marino on June 9th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 4/5

It's really refreshing to see Lincoln Child make a break from his usual writing partner (Douglas Preston) and give us something fresh. I really enjoyed this ride (pardon the pun). The characters and situations were just believable enough to keep me on the edge of my seat. I think the abridged version did a great job of filtering out all the techno-babble that could have caused this story to bog down. And unlike the Preston-Child books, this one had a great ending that actually made sense! Eric Stoltz narration was understated, but effective.

Utopia

Written by Anonymous from Cordova, TN on February 17th, 2005

  • Book Rating: 4/5

It doesn't take long for Utopia to grab you and take you for a thrilling ride. The plot is not outrageous considering the technological advancements in today's theme parks, and the characters deal with the terrorists/extortionists without resorting to unbelievable means that vaporize from nowhere. Steady pace; great resolution.

Author Details

Author Details

Child, Lincoln

Lincoln Child was born in Westport, Connecticut, which he still calls his hometown (despite the fact that he left the place before he reached his first birthday and now only goes back for weekends).

Lincoln seemed to have acquired an interest in writing as early as second grade, when he wrote a short story entitled Bumble the Elephant (now believed by scholars to be lost). Along with two dozen short stories composed during his youth, he wrote a science-fiction novel in tenth grade called Second Son of Daedalus and a shamelessly Tolkeinesque fantasy in twelfth grade titled The Darkness to the North (left unfinished at 400 manuscript pages). Both are exquisitely embarrassing to read today and are kept under lock and key by the author.

After a childhood that is of interest only to himself, Lincoln graduated from Carleton College (huh?) in Northfield, Minnesota, majoring in English. Discovering a fascination for words, and their habit of turning up in so many books, he made his way to New York in the summer of 1979, intent on finding a job in publishing. He was lucky enough to secure a position as editorial assistant at St. Martin's Press.

Over the next several years, he clawed his way up the editorial hierarchy, moving to assistant editor to associate editor before becoming a full editor in 1984. While at St. Martin's, he was associated with the work of many authors, including that of James Herriot and M. M. Kaye. He edited well over a hundred books--with titles as diverse as The Notation of Western Music and Hitler's Rocket Sites--but focused primarily on American and English popular fiction.

While at St. Martin's, Lincoln assembled several collections of ghost and horror stories, beginning with the hardcover collections Dark Company (1984) and Dark Banquet (1985). Later, when he founded the company's mass-market horror division, he edited three more collections of ghost stories, Tales of the Dark 1-3.

In 1987, Lincoln left trade publishing to work at MetLife. In a rather sudden transition, he went from editing manuscripts, speaking at sales conferences, and wining/dining agents to doing highly technical programming and systems analysis. Though the switch might seem bizarre, Lincoln was a propeller-head from a very early age, and his extensive programming experience dates back to high school, when he worked with DEC minis and the now-prehistoric IBM 1620, so antique it actually had an electric typewriter mounted into its front panel. Away from the world of publishing, Lincoln's own nascent interests in writing returned. While at MetLife, Relic was published, and within a few years Lincoln had left the company to write full time. He now lives in New Jersey (under protest--just kidding) with his wife and daughter.

A dilettante by natural inclination, Lincoln's interests include: pre-1950s literature and poetry; post-1950s popular fiction; playing the piano, various MIDI instruments, and the 5-string banjo; English and American history; motorcycles; architecture; classical music, early jazz, blues, and R&B; exotic parrots; esoteric programming languages; mountain hiking; bow ties; Italian suits; fedoras; archaeology; and multiplayer deathmatching.