Wayfaring Stranger

Version: Unabridged
Author: James Lee Burke
Narrator: Will Patton
Genres: Suspense, Literature
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Published In: July 2014
# of Units: 11 CDs
Length: 13 hours
Ratings:
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Overview

From "America's best novelist" ("The Denver Post"): A sprawling thriller drenched with atmosphere and intrigue that takes a young boy from a chance encounter with Bonnie and Clyde to the trenches of World War II and the oil fields along the Texas-Louisiana coast.
It is 1934 and the Depression is bearing down when sixteen-year-old Weldon Avery Holland happens upon infamous criminals Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow after one of their notorious armed robberies. A confrontation with the outlaws ends as Weldon puts a bullet through the rear window of Clyde's stolen automobile.
Ten years later, Second Lieutenant Weldon Holland and his sergeant, Hershel Pine, escape certain death in the Battle of the Bulge and encounter a beautiful young woman named Rosita Lowenstein hiding in a deserted extermination camp. Eventually, Weldon and Rosita fall in love and marry and, with Hershel, return to Texas to seek their fortunes.
There, they enter the domain of jackals known as the oil business. They meet Roy Wiseheart--a former Marine aviator haunted with guilt for deserting his squadron leader over the South Pacific--and Roy's wife Clara, a vicious anti-Semite who is determined to make Weldon and Rosita's life a nightmare. It will be the frontier justice upheld by Weldon's grandfather, Texas lawman Hackberry Holland, and the legendary antics of Bonnie and Clyde that shape Weldon's plans for saving his family from the evil forces that lurk in peacetime America and threaten to destroy them all.

Reviews (4)

Wayfaring Stranger

Written by werner on June 18th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 3/5

A lengthy book with Patten his usual self. Good entertaining story that holds one's interest about the South Ool drilling business Certainly not a mind blower as it drones on too long

Wayfaring Stranger

Written by nab6215 from Altoona, PA on February 9th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Wow. I was lulled in by the voice of narrator Will Patton telling the story of Weldon's youth and time in World War II. Then, as things often do in a James Lee Burke novel, they take off zoooooom. Read the book.

Written by Sandra Mauws on January 31st, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

Didn't want to stop listening. The narrator Will Patton was perfect

a long Burke adventure

Written by Anonymous on August 31st, 2015

  • Book Rating: 3/5

Texas, oil, Louisiana refineries, Bonnie and Clyde, not an easy connection. As always Burke spins a long detailed story about what it was like in another time along the Gulf Coast. It seemed too many coincidences for me, but I enjoyed the journey.

Author Details

Author Details

Burke, James Lee

James Lee Burke was born in Houston, Texas, in 1936 and grew up on the Texas-Louisiana gulf coast. He attended Southwestern Louisiana Institute and later received a B. A. Degree in English and an M. A. from the University of Missouri in 1958 and 1960 respectively. Over the years he worked as a landman for Sinclair Oil Company, pipeliner, land surveyor, newspaper reporter, college English professor, social worker on Skid Row in Los Angeles, clerk for the Louisiana Employment Service, and instructor in the U. S. Job Corps.

He and his wife Pearl met in graduate school and have been married 48 years, they have four children: Jim Jr., an assistant U.S. Attorney; Andree, a school psychologist; Pamala, a T. V. ad producer; and Alafair, a law professor and novelist who has 4 novels out with Henry Holt publishing.

Burke's work has been awarded an Edgar twice for Best Crime Novel of the Year. He has also been a recipient of a Breadloaf and Guggenheim Fellowship and an NEA grant. Two of his novels, Heaven's Prisoners and Two For Texas, have been made into motion pictures. His short stories have been published in The Atlantic Monthly, New Stories from the South, Best American Short Stories, Antioch Review, Southern Review, and The Kenyon Review. His novel The Lost Get-Back Boogie was rejected 111 times over a period of nine years, and upon publication by Louisiana State University press was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

Today he and his wife live in Missoula, Montana, and New Iberia, Louisiana.