Winter Prey

Version: Unabridged
Author: John Sandford
Narrator: Richard Ferrone
Genres: Fiction & Literature, Suspense, Suspense
Publisher: Recorded Books
Published In: July 2001
# of Units: 10 CDs
Length: 12 hours
Ratings:
Tell Your Friends:

Overview

Few writers have explored the human dark side with as much insight and power-and in Winter Prey, his shattering New York Times best-seller, Sandford tells his most ice-blooded tale of all. Minneapolis Lieutenant Lucas Davenport has tracked killers in cities across America. But even he may be unprepared to face the savage murderer hunting human prey in the Wisconsin woods this winter.

Reviews (1)

Winter Prey

Written by nab6215 from Altoona, PA on June 9th, 2016

  • Book Rating: 5/5

You remember Winter Prey because that's where Lucas Davenport meets Weather Karkinnen, instead of anything else about the book, which is a little sad. It's a clever book. Notice that in at least the first three chapters that each scene will either mention the word "weather" or Weather (32x). For comparison, cold is mentioned 24 times. As for as Davenport goes, the detective work doesn't work as much as it stirs up the conspirators and causes trouble for innocents, which plays on the "cold" and "storm coming" themes. When A leads to B and a trap is set, the storm comes in, and the famous line of Davenport is shot by a teenaged psychopath and saved by Weather becomes reality. But why was Weather there? Who was the teenager? Why did she shoot Davenport? Don't take the line, read the book and appreciate the weather.

Author Details

Author Details

Sandford, John

John Sandford was born John Camp on February 23, 1944, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He attended the public schools in Cedar Rapids, graduating from Washington High School in 1962. He then spent four years at the University of Iowa, graduating with a bachelor's degree in American Studies in 1966. In 1966, he married Susan Lee Jones of Cedar Rapids, a fellow student at the University of Iowa. He was in the U.S. Army from 1966-68, worked as a reporter for the Cape Girardeau Southeast Missourian from 1968-1970, and went back to the University of Iowa from 1970-1971, where he received a master's degree in journalism. He was a reporter for The Miami Herald from 1971-78, and then a reporter for the St. Paul Pioneer-Press from 1978-1990; in 1980, he was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize, and he won the Pulitzer in 1986 for a series of stories about a midwestern farm crisis. From 1990 to the present he has written thriller novels. He's also the author of two non-fiction books, one on plastic surgery and one on art. He is the principal financial backer of a major archeological project in the Jordan Valley of Israel, with a website at www.rehov.org In addition to archaeology, he is deeply interested in art (painting) and photography. He both hunts and fishes. He has two children, Roswell and Emily, and one grandson, Benjamin. His wife, Susan, died of metastasized breast cancer in May, 2007, and is greatly missed.